Edward the Confessor’s Chapel

  • About the work
    Location
    Country: UK
    City: London
    Place: Government Art Collection
  • About the artist
    Augustus Charles Pugin fled to England in the 1790s, either because of his Royalism or on account of a duel. He seems to have landed in Wales, where he became a friend of the architect John Nash (1752–1835). He worked as a general artist, providing designs for Nash and painting scenery, before moving to London and studying at the Royal Academy Schools. He first exhibited architectural designs at the Academy in 1799 and, from 1807, began to exhibit at the Old Watercolour Society. Pugin worked on several projects for Rudolf Ackermann, including plates for The Microcosm of London and The Abbey Church of Westminster (1811–12). During this period he set up a school of architectural drawing and began to publish his own works. He was the father of A. W. N. Pugin, who designed the interiors of the Houses of Parliament.
    John Bluck was an aquatint engraver, mainly of topographical views, but also of marine and sporting subjects after his contemporaries. He produced plates for numerous publications.
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  • Details
    Title
    Edward the Confessor’s Chapel
    Date
    Medium
    Colour aquatint
    Dimensions
    height: 34.00 cm, width: 28.00 cm
    Acquisition
    Purchased from Baynton-Williams, January 1978
    GAC number
    13592