Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (1769-1852) Field-Marshal & Prime Minister

  • Image of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (1769-1852) Field-Marshal & Prime Minister
  • About the work

    This marble bust, based on the death mask of former Prime Minister Arthur Wellesley, first Duke of Wellington, was made in 1852, the year of Wellington’s death.

    The sculptor, George Gammon Adams, exhibited six works relating to the Duke of Wellington at the Royal Academy from 1853 to 1859. These were a funeral medal in 1853, a version of this bust and a memorial to the Duke in the following year, a statue of the Duke in 1855, another bronze statue (made for the city of Norwich) in 1856 and a further bust in 1859.

  • About the artist
    George Gammon Adams attended the Royal Academy Schools from 1840. He later spent a year in Rome, studying under John Gibson. Adams gained recognition after exhibiting work at the Great Exhibition and also designing prize medals for the exhibition. In 1852 he was selected to model the death mask of Wellington. Following this Gammon exhibited six works depicting the Duke and gained commissions for several public monuments. He made a series of busts of notable public figures during the 1850s and ‘60s. Adams exhibited at the Royal Academy and the British Institution. His public sculptures include ‘General Sir Charles James Napier’ (1855) on the South-western plinth in Trafalgar Square and the ‘Dean of Ripon’ at St. George’s Hall, Liverpool.
  • Explore
    People
    Wellesley, Arthur, 1st Duke of Wellington
    Places
    Materials & Techniques
    marble, bust (as object name), marble bust
  • Details
    Title
    Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (1769-1852) Field-Marshal & Prime Minister
    Date
    1852
    Medium
    Marble bust
    Dimensions
    height: 75.00 cm, width: 50.00 cm
    Acquisition
    Purchased from T Crowther & Son, December 1950
    Inscription
    Inscribed on verso: GG ADAMS SC / LONDON 1852
    Provenance
    Collection of Philip Guedalla; with T. Crowther & Son; from whom purchased by the Ministry of Works in December 1950
    GAC number
    1226