Portrait of a Young Woman said to be Elizabeth I (1533-1603)

  • About the work
    The portrait cannot be by Hans Holbein (he died in 1543) nor of Queen Elizabeth (born 1533); the style and costume clearly date to the 1590s-1610s.
  • About the artist
    John Faber I was born at The Hague and worked as a portrait miniaturist in the Netherlands until at least 1696. By 1698 he had settled in London. He began to experiment with mezzotint engraving and, by 1707, established a printselling business in the Strand. Faber produced a wide range of engraved portraits, including those of clergy and Jacobites, and four portraits of Charles I. He also made series of portraits such as ‘Twelve Ancient Philosophers’, after Rubens. From 1711 to 1712 he collaborated with engraver George Vertue on a project to engrave portraits in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, and he later made a series of founders of Oxford and Cambridge colleges. His son was engraver John Faber (c.1695-1756). He died in Bristol, aged c.61.
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    People
    unknown woman
    Places
    Subjects
    Materials & Techniques
    mezzotint
  • Details
    Title
    Portrait of a Young Woman said to be Elizabeth I (1533-1603)
    Date
    1742
    Medium
    Mezzotint
    Dimensions
    height: 51.3 cm, width: 36.4 cm
    Acquisition
    Transferred from HM Revenue and Customs, 2017
    Provenance
    Bequest of Sir Ernest Clark to the Inland Revenue, 1951 (received 1972); transferred to GAC, 2017
    GAC number
    10378